Artists Literally Transform Pop Culture

We recently discovered the art of Tim Noble and Sue Webster on a ThisisMarvelous.com blog and there is no doubt that their work is absolutely marvelous. Combining bits of discarded trash with household items, bones from deceased animals, and scraps of metal, this artistic duo from the UK construct elaborate sculptures that in and of themselves, interesting to look at. However, when they are situated just so and the lighting is just right, the shadows these sculptures cast are jaw-droppingly awesome. They are bringing 3D art to an entirely new level and are creating a unique artistic genre.

Image garbage arranged on a table so that it casts a shadow of a city skyline

Anti-Monuments Bring Trash to Live

They refer to their works as “anti-monuments” and as it says on their website, “their work derives much of its power from its fusion of opposites, form and anti-form, high culture and anti-culture, male and female, craft and rubbish, sex and violence.” An analysis of their work brings to the forefront the notion of high vs low art and the value of pop art within the scope of the art history timeline. Their work is a tribute to the ability of pop artists to transform everyday, recognizable objects and icons to convey a complex yet easily digestible message. Bravo!

A large pile of trash lends to a shadow of two people sitting back to back leaning on each other

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